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The oldest surviving indication of an Arab national identity is an inscription made in an archaic form of Arabic in 328 using the Nabataean alphabet, which refers to Imru' al-Qays ibn 'Amr as "King of all the Arabs".

Herodotus refers to the Arabs in the Sinai, southern Palestine, and the frankincense region (Southern Arabia).

Other smaller minority religions are also followed, such as the Bahá'í Faith and Druze. Listed among the booty captured by the army of king Shalmaneser III of Assyria in the Battle of Qarqar are 1000 camels of "Gi-in-di-bu'u the ar-ba-a-a" or "[the man] Gindibu belonging to the Arab (ar-ba-a-a being an adjectival nisba of the noun ʿarab The term Arab and ʾaʿrāb are mentioned around 40 times in pre-Islamic Sabaean inscriptions.

Arabs have greatly influenced and contributed to diverse fields, notably the arts and architecture, language, philosophy, mythology, ethics, literature, politics, business, music, dance, cinema, medicine, science and technology Arabic epitaph of Imru' al-Qais, son of 'Amr, king of all the Arabs", inscribed in Nabataean script. The term Arab occurs also in the titles of the Himyarite kings from the time of 'Abu Karab Asad until Madi Karib Ya'fur.

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Some of the settled communities in the Arabian Peninsula developed into distinctive civilizations.

In the pre-Islamic era, most Arabs followed polytheistic religions.

Some tribes had adopted Christianity or Judaism, and a few individuals, the hanifs, apparently observed monotheism.

Yet another view is held by al-Masudi that the word "Arabs" was initially applied to the Ishmaelites of the "Arabah" valley.

In Biblical etymology, "Arab" (in Hebrew Arvi ) comes both from the desert origin of the Bedouins it originally described (Arava means wilderness).The Arabs forged the Rashidun (632–661), Umayyad (661–750), Abbasid (750–1517) and the Fatimid (901–1071) caliphates, whose borders reached southern France in the west, China in the east, Anatolia in the north, and the Sudan in the south.